Overcoming Addiction

Prescription digital therapeutics leverage software to enhance how we treat human disease.

TREATMENT CHALLENGES

Staying in treatment is critical for people on their recovery journey.

While there’s widespread acknowledgement that millions of Americans struggle with a range of substance use disorders, there’s less awareness that the majority of them are not receiving proper care. Consider the statistics:

  • Of the 21.2 million individuals with substance use disorder who needed help in 2018, only 17% received any formal treatment.1
  • Of 2.1 million with opioid use disorder, only about 1 in 3 received buprenorphine medication-assisted therapy.2

Today, patients with substance use disorder and opioid use disorder face a critical lack of treatment programs, uncertain economic futures, and difficulty accessing in-person care. At the same time, providers are looking to augment their remote care capabilities to keep up with a dramatic surge in demand.3

BARRIERS TO CARE

Clinicians face significant barriers to providing therapy.

Social Stigma
14.9% of adults who feel they need treatment for substance use cite the possible negative opinion of their community as a reason for not receiving treatment.1

Access to Therapy
A study cites 64% (n=50) of physicians who don’t prescribe buprenorphine reported lack of mental health and psychosocial support for patients as a perceived obstacle to prescribing.4

Gaps in Care
Care transitions are critical moments for patients receiving treatment for substance use. Reduced touch points between intensive inpatient care to outpatient care settings can lead to patient drop out.5

ABOUT PRESCRIPTION DIGITAL THERAPEUTICS​

What is a prescription digital therapeutic?

A new therapeutic class that is being integrated into standard of care.

Prescription digital therapeutics are software-generated therapeutic interventions delivered directly to patients to prevent, manage, or treat a medical disorder or disease. They are not wellness or fitness apps, or wearable devices. In many ways, they are held to the same regulatory standards as a biologic or drug. Prescription digital therapeutics as a class:

 

 

  • Have demonstrated safety and efficacy in randomized clinical trials6,7
  • Are authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)8,9
  • Provide pricing and reimbursement pathways designed to reflect health economic value10
  • Include IP, quality, regulatory, and compliance barriers to entry

Unlike traditional wellness apps, prescription digital therapeutics undergo rigorous regulation and testing.

MEET THE UNMET NEED

Why choose prescription digital therapeutics?

Prescription digital therapeutics provide novel therapy options for unmet medical needs. They can be used to enhance or support treatment and:

  • Increase accessibility and may reduce the stigma usually associated with therapeutic treatment
  • Foster engagement by integrating gaming, social technologies, and incentives into therapy
  • Make it easy to control quality through consistent delivery of evidence-based therapy
  • Allow clinicians to customize treatment sessions according to patient-reported feelings, behavior, and activities throughout the week
Interested in prescribing reSET-O or reSET?

reSET-O

Indications for Use:

reSET-O prescription digital therapeutic is a 12-week (84 day) software application intended to increase retention of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) in outpatient treatment by providing cognitive behavioral therapy, as an adjunct to outpatient treatment that includes transmucosal buprenorphine and contingency management, for patients 18 years or older who are currently under the supervision of a clinician. reSET-O is indicated as a prescription-only digital therapeutic.

Important Safety Information for Clinicians:

Warnings: reSET-O is intended for patients whose primary language is English and who have access to an Android/iOS tablet or smartphone. reSET-O is intended only for patients who own a smartphone and are familiar with use of smartphone apps (applications).

Clinicians should not use reSET-O to communicate with their patients about emergency medical issues. Patients should be clearly instructed not to use reSET-O to communicate to their clinician any urgent or emergent information. In case of an emergency, patients should dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

reSET-O is not intended to be used as a stand-alone therapy for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). reSET-O does not replace care by a licensed medical practitioner. reSET-O does not represent a substitution for a patient’s medication. Patients should continue to take their medications as directed by their healthcare provider. The ability of reSET-O to prevent potential relapse after therapy discontinuation has not been studied.

The long-term benefit of reSET-O has not been evaluated in studies lasting beyond 12 weeks (84 days) in the OUD population. The ability of reSET-O to prevent potential relapse after therapy discontinuation has not been studied.

Please see the Clinician Brief Summary Instructions for reSET-O.

reSET

Indications for Use:

reSET is intended to provide cognitive behavioral therapy, as an adjunct to a contingency management system, for patients 18 years of age and older, who are currently enrolled in outpatient treatment under the supervision of a clinician. reSET is indicated as a 12-week (90 day) prescription-only treatment for patients with substance use disorder (SUD), who are not currently on opioid replacement therapy, who do not abuse alcohol solely, or who do not abuse opioids as their primary substance of abuse.

It is intended to:

  • increase abstinence from a patient’s substances of abuse during treatment, and
  • increase retention in the outpatient treatment program.

 

Important Safety Information for Clinicians:

Warnings: reSET is intended for patients whose primary language is English and who have access to an Android/iOS tablet or smartphone. reSET is intended only for patients who own a smartphone and are familiar with use of smartphone apps (applications).

Clinicians should not use reSET to communicate with their patients about emergency medical issues. Patients should be clearly instructed not to use reSET to communicate to their clinician any urgent or emergent information. In case of an emergency, patients should dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

reSET is not intended to be used as a stand-alone therapy for substance use disorder (SUD). reSET does not replace care by a licensed medical practitioner. reSET does not represent a substitution for a patient’s medication. Patients should continue to take their medications as directed by their healthcare provider.

The long-term benefit of treatment with reSET on abstinence has not been evaluated in studies lasting beyond 12 weeks (90 days) in the SUD population. The ability of reSET to prevent potential relapse after treatment discontinuation has not been studied.

Please see the Clinician Brief Summary Instructions for reSET.

 

References:

1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2019. Key substance use and mental health Indicators In the United States: results from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. PEPI9-5068, NSDUH Series H-54). Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from https://www.samhsa.gov/data/

2. McCance-Katz EF. SAMHS/HHS: An Update on the Opioid Crisis. Presented at: AATOD Conference. March 12-14, 2018; New York, NY. Accessed June 10, 2020. https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/aatod_2018_final.pdf

3. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance Abuse: Clinical Issues in Intensive Outpatient Treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 47. DHHS Publication No. (SMA) 06-4182. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2006.

4. Hutchinson E, Catlin M, Andrillas CHA, Baldwin LM, Rosenblatt RA. Barriers to primary care physicians prescribing buprenorphine. Ann Fam Med. 2014;12(2):128-133.

5. Forman RF, Nagy PD. Substance Abuse: Clinical Issues in Intensive Outpatient Treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol TIP 47. Rockville, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. 2006. DHHS Publication No. (SMA) 06-4182.

6. Campbell ANC, Nunes EV, Matthews AG, et al. Internet-delivered treatment for substance abuse: a multisite randomized controlled trial. Am J Psychiatry. 2014;171(6):683-690.

7. Christensen DR, Landes RD, Jackson L, et al. Adding an internet-delivered treatment to an efficacious treatment package for opioid dependence. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2014;82(6):964-972. 

8. FDA clears mobile medical app to help those with opioid use disorder stay in recovery programs. News release. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration. December 10, 2018. Accessed May 18, 2020. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-clears-mobile-medical-app-help-those-opioid-use-disorder-stay-recovery-programs
 
9. FDA permits marketing of mobile medical application for substance use disorder. News release. Silver Spring, MD: US Food and Drug Administration. September 14, 2017. Accessed May 18, 2020. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-permits-marketing-mobile-medical-application-substance-use-disorder
 
10. AMCP Partnership Forum: Digital Therapeutics—What Are They and Where Do They Fit in Pharmacy and Medical Benefits? J Manag Care Spec Pharm, 2020 May;26(5):674-681.
 
This information is intended for US healthcare professionals. Please confirm you are a healthcare professional to continue.